Aims

Staff


Mr D Armstrong (Head of Department)
Mrs C A Henry
Mrs S A Hollywood
Mr D T Matthews
Miss A C Morgan (Part-Time)
Mrs M A Smyth (Part-Time)  

Aims


History is taught as a compulsory subject to years 8 to 10. In years 11 and 12 pupils must choose History, Geography or Home Economics.

Contribution to Overall School Aims
History courses are designed to ensure that pupils acquire a knowledge of Irish, British and World events, and the ways in which they have, in the past, inter-acted. In particular, pupils are presented with information which introduces them to such issues as the origins of the current troubles in Northern Ireland and the emergence of the balance of power in world politics today. By studying such controversial issues pupils develop an ability to question stereotypes, to appreciate that more than one answer to a historical problem is possible, and a tolerance of other people’s points-of-view.

In addition to providing pupils with information, the subject provides opportunities for pupils to acquire and develop a wide range of intellectual skills. These include the handling of a diverse range of source material, the ability to make informed judgements and how to communicate these orally and on paper. These skills equip pupils for the world of work because they are of value in themselves, are appropriate to a wide range of occupations and enable pupils to be open, and capable of, change.

The Contribution of History to the Curriculum
The Department hopes that after studying History for three, five or seven years, each pupils will have benefited to some extent from each of the following general aims. The Department believes that these various skills and attitudes help to prepare young people for the world they live in and for the world of work. History does this by ensuring that pupils will be able to make informed judgements and to produce evidence to support those judgements.

All of this is reflected in the choice of syllabus content since topics have been chosen because of their intrinsic interest, their suitability for developing course objectives and their appropriateness to understanding the world today. Particular emphasis is given to Irish history and Anglo-Irish relations since c1600, but this is set in the context of British and European developments. 

The general aims are: 

1 The   Development of Intellectual skills:
a comprehension – of the content of the syllabus;
b translation – converting information from one medium to another;
c interpretation – of the content of books, documents, stimulus material;
d application – of the techniques of the historian to various problems;
e analysis – of a problem by breaking it up into its constituent parts;
f synthesis – using the skills above to produce a summary of a problem;
g
evaluation – making and communicating judgements.
 
2 The   Development of Historical Concepts:
a a sense of chronology and time;
b an appreciation of change and continuity, and a recognition that change and progress are not necessarily the same;
c an understanding of cause and that events usually have a multiplicity of causes;
d an awareness of the nature of evidence: its variety and diversity; its incompleteness; the need to interpret it;
e an ability to distinguish between historical facts and the interpretation of those facts;
f an awareness that historical explanation is provisional, debatable and sometimes controversial;
g an ability to pose historical questions;
h
historical empathy: the ability to enter into a past experience while at the same time remaining outside it in order to exercise judgement.
 
3 The   Development of Social Skills:
a to encourage co-operative behaviour through group work in projects;
b to encourage respect for artefacts and evidence by visits to museums (where these can be arranged) and historic sites;
c to develop pupils’ powers of communication and expression, their imagination, aesthetic awareness and powers of observation;
d
to develop an awareness of the contribution of Information Technology to History.
 
4 The   Development of Attitudes
a to give pupils some understanding of the society in which they live;
b to develop a respect and tolerance for opposing views;
c to develop a continuing interest in History as a leisure time pursuit.

KS3

The history programme of study for Key Stage 3 builds on the knowledge, skills and understanding that pupils acquire during Key Stage 2.

Knowledge, skills and understanding in History In history, pupils acquire and apply knowledge, skills and understanding in five main areas:

  • chronological understanding;
  • knowledge and understanding of events, people and changes in the past;
  • historical interpretation;
  • historical enquiry;
  • organisation and communication.

Progression in history is achieved by integrating key concepts, key processes and content in order to develop pupils’ understanding.

SEPTEMBER
Detective Exercise
Claimants to the throne Hastings
Battle of Hastings

OCTOBER
Battle of Hastings

NOVEMBER
How the Normans controlled England: Feudalism & Castles

DECEMBER
How the Normans controlled England: Feudalism & Castles
The Medieval Church

JANUARY
The Murder of Becket

FEBRUARY
The Murder of Becket
Ireland c1165-1175

MARCH
Ireland c1165-c1175
Medieval Towns
Medieval Villages

APRIL
The Black Death

MAY
The Black Death

JUNE
The Peasants’ Revolt
Wall Work – Review the Normans – change/continuity

What was the Impact of the First World WarHaig

SEPTEMBER TO DECEMBER
Why study the First World War?
Brainstorm what the pupils expect to find out about the First War World.

What were the Causes of the First World War?
Examination of Long Term and Trigger causes

Early stages of the War
Events from the invasion of Belgium to the Stalemate on the Western Front.

Why was Propaganda important?
The role of Propaganda
Why did people volunteer to fight?

What was Life in the Trenches like?
Soldiers’ letters/letter home to highlight different aspects of Trench Life 

What happened during the Battle of the Somme?
Was Field Marshal Haig a Hero or a Villain?
MaryStuart
What was the Impact of the First World War?
Activity focusing on looking at change and continuity during the war

JANUARY TO END OF APRIL
Why was there conflict in the 16th and 17th Century?

What was The Reformation?

Why was Mary Queen of Scots such a controversial figure?

What caused the English Civil War?
Examine long and short term causes of the Civil War.
Who was most to blame for the English Civil War?

Overview of the Civil War

Was Charles I a Traitor?
Source work activity
Was Parliament right to kill the King?

SEPTEMBER TO JANUARY
Introduction and overview of the USA in the 1920s 
America ‘the Land of Opportunity’
Why did people want to come to America? – push and pull factors.
What was the Immigration experience like? – Ellis Island and the Melting Pot.

Government of USA
How is America governed?
Outline government, power of the President and the Constitution (Bill of Rights)

Prohibition
Why was Prohibition introduced?
Why did it fail?Lewis

Intolerance in 1920s America
How intolerant was America in the 1920s?
Overview of racial, religious and political intolerance
Who were the Ku Klux Klan? – aims, beliefs, support, tactics Why did KKK membership decline?

Economic Boom
Why was there an economic boom?

The Roaring Twenties
How did society change in the 1920s?
Jazz Age, flappers, changing lifestyles, women.

Wall Street Crash
What is the stock market?
What were the causes of the Wall Street Crash? EvaClarkeWhat were the consequences of the crash?
Short and long-term including the Depression.

Holocaust Education Day
All pupils in Year 10 have a day on Holocaust education which ends with a talk by a Holocaust survivor.

FEBRUARY TO JUNE
Introduction and overview of the causes and consequences of partition in Ireland

Causes of Partition
What was the impact of the Act of Union?

Famine
The causes, course and consequences of the Famine
How well did people respond to the Famine?

Irish Nationalism
Republicanism
Constitutional Nationalism
Gaelic Revival

Parnell
The rise and fall of Parnell
The impact of Parnell on Ireland

Unionism Unionism
North and South
Reasons for Unionist opposition to Home Rule  
The Industrial North

1912-1914 Crisis
How did Carson and Craig oppose the 3rd Home Rule Bill?
What was the effect of Unionist opposition during 1912-14?
WWI – Buckingham Palace Conference
Somme
1914-1918
The Impact of the First World War on Ireland
1916 Easter Rising – effect on Unionists and Nationalists
Somme – effect on Unionists
Conscription Crisis – on Nationalists
The General Election Results (1918)

1919-1921
The Anglo-Irish War
The Government of Ireland Act
The Anglo-Irish Treaty
The Irish Civil War

The Impact of Partition
Divided Island and Divided Society
The Troubles and their impact
Where are we today?

By the end of Key Stage 3, Pupils studying history can demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the past by describing people, events and features of past societies and periods. Pupils begin to analyse the nature and extent of continuity and change within and across periods, and they suggest relationships between causes of events. Pupils begin to explain how and why interpretations of the past have been constructed, and they begin to recognise why some aspects of the past might be judged as more significant than others. Asking their own questions and evaluating evidence, pupils investigate historical problems and issues. They select, organise and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce structured work.

GCSE

GCSE History


Awarding body CCEA
The GCSE History course is both interesting and rewarding. It builds on the approach already used in Key Stage 3 so that pupils should not experience too much difficulty coming to terms with the demands of the course. Pupils receive a GCSE Induction booklet to help support their learning during GCSE.

Course Details LordKitch
Content: Pupils will sit two written papers, worth a total of 75%:

Unit 1: Study in Depth (50%)
Unit 2: Outline Study (25%)
Unit 3:  Investigative Study – Controlled Assessment (25%)

Please refer to the Subject Choice for GCSE Information Booklet for further information on full course details and criteria for entry. .

GCE

GCE History


Awarding body CCEA
History is much more than reading about past events. The GCE course can help develop and deploy a range of important skills such as collecting and evaluating information, independent thought, weighing up the evidence that pupils have found and putting a case together to support their conclusions. AS and A Level History enables pupils to acquire a range of skills which are transferable to other areas of study and ultimately to a range of professions and jobs e.g. Law, Journalism, Business and Management. Both courses should provide a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course for all pupils whether they progress to further study in the subject or not. Pupils receive a GCE Induction booklet to help support their learning during GCE.

Course Content:
There are two units at AS and two at A2. In each of the units at AS and A2, there are a number of options and pupils study one option in each unit.

AS Level - Year 13
In AS unit 1, Pupils investigate specific historical questions using sources.

A2 Level - Year 14
In A2 unit 1, Pupils study change and/or development, making links and drawing comparisons across different aspects of the period studied.

Please refer to the Subject Choice for AS/A Level Information Booklet for further information on full course details and criteria for entry.

Economics


This subject is offered as both an AS and A-level option. The course followed is that laid down by CEA’s specification for this subject. At AS level, pupils study the operation and limitations of markets and the workings of the national economy. At A2 level, we study business economics and the global economy.

It is the view of the Department that Economics is most useful and enjoyable when it is rooted in real-world affairs, and pupils are accordingly encouraged to develop their interest in empirical business and commerce matters.

Economics is a popular subject, attracting significant numbers of pupils in both Year 13 and Year 14. The Department seeks to ensure that pupils are equipped for the study of the subject at university level, whilst becoming more informed and aware consumers of scarce resources.

GCE Economics


Awarding Body CCEA
Course Content:            
The Advanced Subsidiary course consists of two modules: Markets and Prices and The National Economy.

The A2 course consists of a further two modules: Business Economics and The International Economy.

Each AS module is assessed through structured essays and data response questions. Each A2 module is assessed through an essay and unseen case study.

Pupils will gain knowledge of how the economy works and should become more financially aware as a result of their study of this subject.

Please refer to the Subject Choice for AS/A Level Information Booklet for further information on full course details and criteria for entry.

Government and Politics


The Department offers Government and Politics as an AS and A Level option. The course followed is chosen from within the specification provided by the local examination body, CEA. At AS level, we study the government and politics of Northern Ireland and the British political process, looking at such issues as Prime Ministerial power and the inter-relationships of the executive, legislative and judiciary. At A2 level, we compare the British and American systems of government and study the concept of political power.

Pupils are encouraged to adopt an open-minded approach to political issues, learning to listen to alternative viewpoints and reaching balanced evaluations based on evidence rather than prejudice. An active interest in current affairs is promoted; to this end the Department runs a Politics Society, to which guest speakers are invited throughout the academic year.

GCE Government and Politics


Awarding Body CCEA
Course Content:            
The Advanced Subsidiary course consists of two modules: The Government and Politics of Northern Ireland and The British Political Process.

The A2 course consists of a further two modules: Comparative Government and Political Power.

Each AS and A2 module is assessed by a final examination consisting of structured questions, source questions or an essay.

Please refer to the Subject Choice for AS/A Level Information Booklet for further information on full course details and criteria for entry.

Homework

Years 8-10


Homework tasks will be set to complete written exercises begun during class time. These tasks will usually be expected to be finished for next day of class.

At the end of topics, revision homeworks will be set to prepare for class topic tests.

Certain written tasks will be set for handing in by the pupil for marking by the class teacher

Years 11-12


Homework tasks will be set to complete written exercises begun during class time. These tasks will usually be expected to be finished for next day of class.

At the end of topics, revision homeworks will be set to prepare for class topic tests.

Certain written tasks, such as past paper questions, will be set for handing in by the pupil for marking by the class teacher. These tasks will usually be expected to complete over several nights as homework.

During their controlled assessment period, pupils will be expected to carry out independent research on the topic under investigation at home.

Years 13-14


History
Homework tasks such as note making or questions and reading will be set on a regular basis throughout A Level studies. These tasks will usually be expected to be finished for next day of class.

Pupils will be expected, as homework, to research and note examples of historial interpretation in some of the units studied on a regular basis throughout A Level studies.

Certain written tasks, such as essay questions and source questions, will be set as homework for handing in by the pupil for marking by the class teacher. These tasks will usually be expected to complete over several nights as homework.

Economics and Government & Politics
Two reading homeworks per week.
One to 2 written homeworks per fortnight